Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Neese’

Senators Isakson, Chambliss visit YHC

September 16, 2011 Comments off

Senators Isakson and Chambliss shake hands with students and community members at the Town Hall meeting held in the Recreation and Fitness Center. Photo by Ashton Jones

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

Georgia’s two senators Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) and Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.) came to the Young Harris College campus to host a town hall meeting on August 30.  The senators discussed current issues and gave both students and the townspeople an opportunity to voice their concerns and ask questions.

YHC President Cathy Cox opened the assembly by greeting the students and members of the community. Rev. Dr. Tim Moore, campus minister, led the invocation and Student Government Association President Emalyn Cork led the crowd in the Pledge of Allegiance. Local elected officials from Towns and Union Counties were recognized.

The senators began by sharing a bit of their background. Chambliss and Isakson graduated from the University of Georgia in the same year, both with business degrees. Chambliss received his law degree from the University of Tennessee and Isakson served in the Georgia Air National Guard. Each shared stories about their political careers and their rise to the Senate before the start of the meeting.

Isakson began his address to the audience by saying that town hall meetings are “about you and us listening to you.”

Isakson spoke about the importance of living within one’s means and the U.S. government’s need to do the same, reforming Social Security, fixing Medicare and advocating for tax reform.

Isakson then turned over the floor to Chambliss, who stressed they were “here primarily to hear from you.”

Chambliss went on to say that the United States is in a lot of trouble that had been building up for years. He identified the national debt, as opposed to terrorism, as the number one security concern for the country.  Chambliss said if the debt problem is not fixed, then his will be the first generation in history to leave the country in worse shape than when they received it. Chambliss reiterated they have to find a way to increase revenue in ways other than raising taxes.

His suggestions for increasing revenue included reducing tax rates, invigorating the economy and expanding the tax base of people going to work.

After the senators spoke, they opened up the floor for questions from the audience.

One question, asked by junior history major Ali Manzanares from Chatsworth, dealt with controversy over immigration. Manzanares asked the senators if immigration had  impacted the country at the national level.

The senators said border security needs to be put first and then they need to figure out how to deal with the people who are in the United States illegally. The senators said it is a huge problem in Georgia that they believe that it should be dealt with “quickly and frankly.”

Both senators believe there should not be 50 different immigration laws across the country.

Another question dealt with the Pell Grant, which many YHC students benefit from, and asked if funds for the scholarship would be cut. The senators answered that the government needs to prioritize the money that is spent, investing money in education instead of the Middle East.

Many other questions were covered in this hour-long meeting, including one man making the claim that he knew of more than 20 nuclear bombs west of Mississippi, though his claims were quickly dismissed by the crowd.

After the questions had been asked and the discussion time had come to a close, the senators thanked everyone for coming and encouraged them to feel free to contact each of them.

Advertisements

Academic Convocation kicks off year

August 29, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

New and returning Young Harris College students filled the Hilda D. Glenn Auditorium in the Clegg Fine Arts Building on Aug.16 at 7 p.m. for the annual Academic Convocation.

Ruth Looper, dean of the Division of Humanities, welcomed the students and faculty to the event that “mark[ed] the beginning of our academic year.” All students had the opportunity to attend the event, where YHC faculty and staff challenged students to make the most of their college experience.

To open the ceremony, Reverend Tim Moore, YHC campus minister, led the invocation. Following the invocation, Jeff Bauman, professor of Music, led the audience in singing YHC’s alma mater.

President Cathy Cox welcomed both faculty and students to what she called the “new” Young Harris College.  Describing the large number of changes that have occurred on the college’s campus in the last four years, including the addition of new buildings, students, and faculty members, Cox said she believes these changes make the campus feel like a fresh college every year.

Cox also stressed to the incoming freshmen they have “entered a whole new realm of learning” where students who put forth the required time and effort will reach formerly unrecognized levels of potential.

Following Cox’s speech, SGA President Emalyn Cork led the student address and encouraged students to let service “saturate their lives” and to make this year “a year to not only get involved but to pour into the lives of others.”

Dr. Ron Roach, vice president for Academic Affairs, gave the academic charge where he both challenged and encouraged students to make the most of their time here at YHC.

Roach asked students what they would do with the unique opportunity given to them by attending YHC and stated that “small learning communities can inspire great learning and teaching.”

Roach emphasized that students will be pushed and challenged while attending YHC, but the key ingredient to their success here is found in their attitude. He then outlined what he believes is an excellent guide for active learning, modeled after Benton Mackaye’s purpose for hiking the Appalachian Trail, which states, “To walk, to see, to see what you see.”

Roach stated that “being an active learner is like walking, being an observant learner is like seeing, and that being a reflective learner coincides with “seeing what you can see.”

Following Roach’s academic charge, student Chair of the Honor Council, Courtney Moore, presented Cox with the Honor Code signatures from the entering freshman and new students. Cox then pronounced the opening of the academic year.

The benediction was given by Moore and was followed by the recession of the faculty and then the students.

When asked to comment on the night’s events, incoming freshman Madison Perdue, a biology major from Loganville, Ga., said while she did not expect the formality of the ceremony, she found it “inspiring and amazing.”

Returning student Megan Powell, a junior human communication major from Cleveland, Ga., said she found Roach’s speech to be “captivating because he challenged you to want to learn.”

Spring break, then and now

March 1, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

Across the Young Harris College campus, new life is beginning to stir. The sun is shining and students are beginning to shed their winter layers and head outdoors. The new warmth in the air is hinting at the end of cold temperatures and everyone is looking forward to the summer months to come. Before we can skip to summer, however, there is one much-anticipated activity that must take place: spring break 2011.

When most people think of spring break, they think of the beach, parties and hanging out with friends. It is a week-long celebration that allows students a chance to unwind in the middle of a stressful semester. What many do not know, however, is that the history of spring break can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. According to CoolestSpringBreak.com, “The young men and women of these cultures welcomed the return of spring.”

The website also reveals that these ancient people enjoyed a good party, too, saying that they celebrated with days of drinking and dancing, probably not unlike today’s spring break parties.

Our modern-day idea of Spring Break, however, began in 1936 when the swim coach at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York brought his swim team to Fort Lauderdale to practice. The trip was successful and became a tradition for the school and for college swimmers in general. Gradually the popularity of travelling to Fort Lauderdale in late winter grew among college students with approximately 20,000 visiting in 1954.

For years Fort Lauderdale was the “official” spring break headquarters, but in the 1980s it lost its title to Daytona Beach. Daytona was the main Spring Break destination in the early 1990s, but students were also beginning to explore others areas as their spring getaway, such as Panama City, which hosted over a half-million spring breakers in 1997 alone.

Along with different Florida cities gaining popularity for this mid-semester vacation, many people began traveling abroad, exploring areas such as Cancun, Mexico, the Bahamas and Jamaica. In more recent years, ski trips and mission trips have also become popular things to do on break.

Just like today, YHC students from years past felt the stress of school and looked forward to this much needed break as well. The assistant editor of the Enotah Echoes in 1984 wrote about the necessity of spring break in her column. She says that her fellow students were feeling run down, emotions were high and everyone was in need of a break from academic life—something that today’s YHC students can definitely relate to.

She continued by saying that many students would spend their break at the beach with friends, while others would go home to hang out with their family members.

A similar article written in April of 1992 tells what that year’s YHC students did for their spring break. As can be expected, several mentioned the beach and quality time with family, while others say that they worked. One student even travelled to Norway over her spring break.

Clint Hobbs, vice president for Enrollment Management and YHC class of ‘88, says that spring break was a blast when he was a student. It took place in April instead of March and oftentimes fraternities and sororities coordinated their trips so that they went to the same location. Just like today, popular places for students were Panama City and Myrtle Beach.

Whether you decide to head to the beach, go on a mission trip, or just relax at home, it is safe to say that everyone at YHC is ready for this much-needed break.

Singer, politicos among YHC alum

February 21, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

Young Harris College might be a small school nestled in the North Georgia mountains, but it has seen its fair share of former students turn into household names. YHC has many notable alumni that it claims, including two former Georgia Governors, Congressmen, members of the clergy and entertainers.

Probably one of YHC’s most well-known alumni is former Georgia governor and U.S. Senator Zell Miller. Born in the city of Young Harris, Zell attended school at YHC and later became a member of the faculty. While on staff at YHC Miller also became the mayor of Young Harris, then became a state senator and was later elected to lieutenant governor, a position that he held for sixteen years. In 1990, he ran for governor of Georgia and was in office for two terms. His impact on both the state of Georgia and YHC will be remembered for years to come.

As many YHC students know, a late-night trip to Waffle House is often the perfect study break. What might not be so well-known is that the co-founder of the Waffle House chain is a graduate of our small college. Tom Forkner, a member of the class of 1937, along with business partner Joe Rogers, went on to open what has become “America’s second-largest family-style restaurant,” according to the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

Along with Forkner, YHC can also boast of educating a famous country singer. Trisha Yearwood, a graduate of YHC class of 1984, was a member of both Sigma Beta Sigma as well as the Dorcas Society. According to the New Georgia Encyclopedia, in 1991 she released her debut album, which sold two million copies, earning her the Academy of Country Music’s award for the top new female vocalist. Since her career began, Yearwood has released 11 studio albums and was inducted into both the Grand Ole Opry and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.

Yet another YHC alum that has made a name for himself is the late poet and novelist, Byron Herbert Reece. A part of the class of 1940, Reece began showing his literary talents at an early age. He served as a writer-in-residence at the University of California at Los Angeles, Emory University and YHC. He is described as “the poet whose old-fashioned, finely crafted ballads and lyrics celebrate the life and heritage of the Blue Ridge Mountains,” as described by the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Reece wrote four books of poetry and two novels, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and received two Guggenheim awards. Despite his success, Reece’s life was hard. Both of his parents became sick with tuberculosis, a disease Reece also contracted from caring for them. On June 3, 1958, while on staff at YHC, Reece finished grading his students’ papers and then committed suicide in his office.

Many YHC students will agree that this small college has made a big impact on our lives. We have all learned lessons, both in and out of the classroom that we will carry with us well into the future. We are all capable of great things, only time will tell who will become the next household name.

Categories: Headline News Tags: ,

Romance through the years at YHC

February 10, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

In today’s society public displays of affection are not uncommon, and with the fast approach of Valentine’s Day, they are sure to become even more prevalent. We are used to seeing members of the opposite sex interact through holding hands, kissing and talking. While many might agree that some couples can take it too far, for the most part nothing is done about it. We simply roll our eyes and move on with our day. There was once a time at Young Harris College where this interaction was not taken so lightly.

According to Debra March, associate library director and librarian for special collections as well as the chair for Ad Hoc Committee for the 125th Anniversary Celebration, there was a time in YHC’s history where male and female students could not even speak to each other.

They attended the same classes, but as a rule that was the extent of their interaction. According to March, this desire to keep boys and girls separate is the reason that the Susan B. Harris Chapel has two entrances and that Sharp Hall has two staircases leading up to it.

Although occasionally this no communication rule was dropped for a couple of hours on Sundays. This did not deter the male and female students from attempting to get to know one another or developing a “case” for someone, or better known today as a crush.

One way that couples tried to “keep the romance alive” was through the passing of notes. Now this might bring a smirk to our faces today, but these students had to take some desperate measures in order to make contact with the one they loved.

Oftentimes folded notes would be placed in books or hymnals and passed on until they reached their destination. Some members of the faculty were sympathetic to their students’ plight and would aid them in passing notes to their beloved. But others made it their personal mission to catch these rule-breakers and bring them to justice. March gave the example of one faculty member going so far as to prod through a woodpile with his cane in an attempt to find these forbidden love notes.

As mentioned earlier, sometimes male and female students were allowed to spend time together on Sundays. They were only permitted a couple of hours; but regardless of the short amount of time, it was a greatly looked forward to activity. An article in the Enotah Echoes dated October 15, 1927, talks about the joy felt by the student body when these rigid rules were lifted one Sunday. The writer says that “even the ‘dignified seniors’ were shaken out of their usual self control, and exhibited as much childish glee as the freshmen.”

Of course, students could not go just anywhere when they were given this freedom. While they could sit and talk to each other, wherever they were sitting had to allow a chaperone to walk completely around them, explaining why there are benches in the middle of patches of grass on YHC’s campus.

Despite the strict rules, many couples have met and continue to meet at YHC, prompting former college president Dr. Charles Clegg to say that “Young Harris is like a shoe factory—they start out as singles but leave in pairs.”

Romance through the decades at YHC

February 8, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

In today’s society public displays of affection are not uncommon, and with the fast approach of Valentine’s Day, they are sure to become even more prevalent. We are used to seeing members of the opposite sex interact through holding hands, kissing and talking. While many might agree that some couples can take it too far, for the most part nothing is done about it. We simply roll our eyes and move on with our day. There was once a time at Young Harris College where this interaction was not taken so lightly.

According to Debra March, associate library director and librarian for special collections as well as the chair for Ad Hoc Committee for the 125th Anniversary Celebration, there was a time in YHC’s history where male and female students could not even speak to each other.

They attended the same classes, but as a rule that was the extent of their interaction. According to March, this desire to keep boys and girls separate is the reason that the Susan B. Harris Chapel has two entrances and that Sharp Hall has two staircases leading up to it.

Although occasionally this no communication rule was dropped for a couple of hours on Sundays. This did not deter the male and female students from attempting to get to know one another or developing a “case” for someone, or better known today as a crush.

One way that couples tried to “keep the romance alive” was through the passing of notes. Now this might bring a smirk to our faces today, but these students had to take some desperate measures in order to make contact with the one they loved.

Oftentimes folded notes would be placed in books or hymnals and passed on until they reached their destination. Some members of the faculty were sympathetic to their students’ plight and would aid them in passing notes to their beloved. But others made it their personal mission to catch these rule-breakers and bring them to justice. March gave the example of one faculty member going so far as to prod through a woodpile with his cane in an attempt to find these forbidden love notes.

As mentioned earlier, sometimes male and female students were allowed to spend time together on Sundays. They were only permitted a couple of hours; but regardless of the short amount of time, it was a greatly looked forward to activity. An article in the Enotah Echoes dated October 15, 1927, talks about the joy felt by the student body when these rigid rules were lifted one Sunday. The writer says that “even the ‘dignified seniors’ were shaken out of their usual self control, and exhibited as much childish glee as the freshmen.”

Of course, students could not go just anywhere when they were given this freedom. While they could sit and talk to each other, wherever they were sitting had to allow a chaperone to walk completely around them, explaining why there are benches in the middle of patches of grass on YHC’s campus.

Despite the strict rules, many couples have met and continue to meet at YHC, prompting former college president Dr. Charles Clegg to say that “Young Harris is like a shoe factory—they start out as singles but leave in pairs.”

YHC plans events for 125th anniversary

January 25, 2011 Comments off

By Ali Neese, Staff Writer

Throughout campus, Young Harris College is boasting its 125th anniversary. Events have been planned, signs are up and the college is buzzing with excitement as it remembers its rich past and looks toward its bright future.

What many do not realize is that YHC has overcome many obstacles in order to get to the ripe, old age that it is today. According to Debra March, YHC “should never have worked.”

She said that there were no roads when the school was built. Back then, in order to reach the school, students had to ride a train to Murphy, and then take a horse and wagon to get to the campus.

March stressed that many schools do not survive as long as YHC has and that 125 years of being private, church-affiliated is a big deal for any school.

To celebrate this milestone in the life of the college, special events are taking place throughout the year, such as graduation and homecoming, but there are also events going on this week to get students involved. Beginning Wednesday evening, there will be a special chapel service featuring Dr. John Kay of the class of 1956 as the speaker. Another YHC alumnus, Rosemary Royston, will be delivering the “This I Believe” portion of chapel. On Thursday there will be a on-campus scavenger hunt hosted by SGA, in order to educate students about the history of YHC. Friday night there will be a decade’s dance in the old gym to wrap up the week’s festivities.

March said, “we wanted an opportunity for the students to celebrate the school, because you guys are the college.”

March hopes that students enjoy the events that she and other students have helped to organize.

Students and faculty alike are excited about this milestone.

Emalyn Cork, a biology major from Marietta, is looking forward to the anniversary because “it shows that not only has Young Harris lasted this many years and that it’s impacted so many people, but that it’s progressing at the same time.”

Kelli Fell, admission specialist for the YHC, said that she is “excited about participating in the events celebrating our 125th anniversary.”

Fell believes that it will be interesting to learn about our past and to see how far we’ve come.